Nova Publishers
My Account Nova Publishers Shopping Cart
HomeBooksSeriesJournalsReference CollectionseBooksInformationSalesImprintsFor Authors
            
  Top » Catalog » Books » My Account  |  Cart Contents  |  Checkout   
Quick Find
  
Use keywords to find the product you are looking for.
Advanced Search
What's New? more
_Cancer Research Journal - This journal ceased publication after 4#4 (2010). Back Issues are available.
$195.00
Shopping Cart more
0 items
Information
Shipping & Returns
Privacy Notice
Conditions of Use
Contact Us
Notifications more
NotificationsNotify me of updates to Intelligence in the American Civil War
Tell A Friend
 
Tell someone you know about this product.
Intelligence in the American Civil War
Retail Price: $69.00
10% Online Discount
You Pay:

$62.10
Authors: Thomas Allen 
Book Description:
Though much has been written about the American Civil War itself, little has been written about the spy war that went on within. The chronicling of Civil War intelligence activities challenges historians because of the lack of records, the lack of access to records, and the questionable truth of other records. Judah P. Benjamin, the Confederacy’s Secretary of State, burned all the intelligence records he could find as federal troops entered Richmond. Union intelligence records were kept sealed in the National Archives until 1953. A few individuals involved in intelligence gathering burned their personal papers while others chose to publish their memoirs, though greatly embellishing their exploits. Even today, the identities of many spies remain secret. Henry Thomas Harrison, for example, was a Confederate spy whose intelligence set in motion the events that produced the battle of Gettysburg. But neither his first name nor details of his long career as a spy were known until 1986, when historian James O. Hall published an article about him. Though the idea of centralized intelligence gathering was decades away, the age-old resistance to the idea was present even then. Neither side saw the need to create such intelligence organizations, but each side approached the idea of effectively acquiring intelligence in their own way. The Confederacy’s Signal Corps, devoted primarily to communications and intercepts, included a covert agency, the Secret Service Bureau. This unit ran espionage and counter-espionage operations in the North. Late in the war, the bureau set up a secret headquarters in Canada and sent out operatives on covert missions in Northern states. The Union’s Bureau of Military Information, unlike the Confederacy’s Secret Service Bureau, operated for specific generals rather than for the Union Army itself. But here was born the idea of what would eventually become a centralized military intelligence division. Each side still used age-old intelligence techniques, such as code-breaking, deception, and covert surveillance. However, into this modern war came two innovations that would endure as tools of espionage: wiretapping and overhead reconnaissance. What follows is a look at some of the highlights of how the North and the South gathered and used their information, the important missions, and the personalities. From this special view, the focus is not on the battlefield, but on a battle of wits.

Table of Contents:
Preface

The Civil War

Introduction, pp. 1-2

Saving Mr. Lincoln, pp. 3-10

Intelligence Collection - The South, pp. 11-20

Intelligence Collection - The North, pp. 21-30

The Bureau of Military Information, pp. 31-38

Black Dispatches, pp. 39-46

Intelligence’s New Tools, pp. 47-56

Intelligence Overseas, pp. 57-64

Conspiracy in Canada, pp. 65-72

Epilogue, pp. 73-78

Postscript: Then and Now, the Guard Posts at Langley

Suggested Readings

Index

   Series:
      Intelligence and Counterintelligence Studies
   Binding: Softcover
   Pub. Date: 2010
   ISBN: 978-1-60692-209-5
   Status: AV
  
Status Code Description
AN Announcing
FM Formatting
PP Page Proofs
FP Final Production
EP Editorial Production
PR At Prepress
AP At Press
AV Available
  
Special Focus Titles
01.Violent Communication and Bullying in Early Childhood Education
02.Cultural Considerations in Intervention with Women and Children Exposed to Intimate Partner Violence
03.Chronic Disease and Disability: The Pediatric Lung
04.Fruit and Vegetable Consumption and Health: New Research
05.Fire and the Sword: Understanding the Impact and Challenge of Organized Islamism. Volume 2

Nova Science Publishers
© Copyright 2004 - 2020

Intelligence in the American Civil War