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Ideological Debates in Family Medicine
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Editors: Stephen Buetow and Tim Kenealy (University of Auckland)
Book Description:
This book brings together opposing chapters that range in form from scientific discussions to personal narratives. The need to listen to, and respect, different perspectives is especially relevant to the content and process of family medicine – the body of knowledge on which family practice or general practice is based. As a clinical discipline, family medicine is open to different perspectives because it tolerates rather than minimizes high uncertainty and low agreement in a world of ever increasing complexity. Understanding in family medicine is also messily context sensitive, holistic and relational, quintessentially coordinating the situated subjectivity and individualism of the art of care with the putative objectivity and collectivism of science. For family medicine, evidence has always been the changing totality of the evidence of ideas – drawn from science, theory, practical experience, expertise, the law and ethics. Ideological debates thus find a natural home in family medicine where they celebrate diverse social perspectives in which clinical issues are merely one element.
No current text brings together such debates in one coherent work. Various scholars have continued to develop contested and changing concepts and models of primary care and family medicine. However, there remains an unmet need for a work dedicated specifically to grappling in a rigorous and comprehensive manner with the most important practical issues challenging the discipline today. This book aims to respond to the opportunity this lacuna presents and so offer a menu of options for a unified family medicine.

Table of Contents:
Preface

Acknowledgements

Editors and Contributors:Biographies

Introduction

Chapter I - Family Medicine should Redefine its Essential Attributes:
Affirmative position; pp. 13-23
(Frede Olesen, Peter Vedsted, Research Unit for General Practice, Univ. of Aarhus, Denmark)

Chapter II - Family Medicine should Redefine its Essential Attributes: Negative Position; pp. 25-33
(Igor Švab, Dept. of Family Medicine, Ljubljana Medical School, Slovenia, Chris van Weel, Dept. of General Practice, Univ. of Nijmegen, Nijmegen, The Netherlands)

Chapter III - Family Medicine should Rediscover a Focus on Family Care: Affirmative Position; pp. 35-44
(Roy Gerard, Dept. of Family Practice, Michigan State Univ., Michigan, United States)

Chapter IV - Family Medicine should Rediscover a Focus on Family Care: Negative Position; pp. 45-50
(Insoo Hyun, Dept. of Bioethics, Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, Ohio, United States)

Chapter V - Family Medicine should Emphasize Population Care: Affirmative Position; pp. 51-62
(Fran Baum, Angela Lawless, Dept. of Public Health, Flinders Univ., Adelaide, Australia)

Chapter VI - Family Medicine should Emphasize Population care: Negative Position; pp. 63-71
(Heinz-Harald Abholz, Dept. of General Practice, Univ. of Düesseldorf, Germany)

Chapter VII - Family Medicine should Focus on the ‘Sick’: Affirmative
Position; pp. 73-81
(Iona Heath, Royal College of General practitioners, England)

Chapter VIII - Family Medicine should Focus on the ‘Sick’: Negative
Position; pp. 83-94
(David Weller, Dept. of General Practice, Univ. of Edinburgh, Scotland)

Chapter IX - Family Medicine should Encourage its Clinicians to
Subspecialize: Affirmative Position; pp. 95-106
(Brenda Leese, Centre for Research in Primary Care, Univ. of Leeds, England)

Chapter X - Family Medicine should Encourage its Clinicians to
Subspecialize: Negative Position; pp. 107-119
Barbara Starfield, Johns Hopkins Univ,, Baltimore, United States, Juan Gérvas, Equipo Cesca, Madrid, Spain)

Chapter XI - Family Medicine should Tolerate Uncertainty to Manage
Clinical Risk: Affirmative Position; pp. 121-128
(Walter Rosser, Dept. of Family Medicine, Queens Univ., Kingston, Ontario, Canada)

Chapter XII - Family Medicine should Tolerate Uncertainty to Manage
Clinical Risk: Negative Position; pp. 129-139
(Amit Ghosh, Division of General Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota, USA)

Chapter XIII - Family Medicine should be more Evidence-based than at
Present: Affirmative Position; pp. 141-152
(Timothy Kenealy, Bruce Arroll, Dept. of General Practice and Primary Health Care, Univ. of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand)

Chapter XIV - Family Medicine should be more Evidence-based than at
Present: Negative Position; pp. 153-164
(Ross Upshur, C Shawn Tracy, Primary Care Research Unit, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario, Canada)

Chapter XV - Family Medicine should Shift Attention from Rationality to Emotions: Affirmative Position; pp. 165-172
(Kirsti Malterud, Section for General Practice, Dept. of Public Health and Primary Health Care, Univ. of Bergen, Bergen, Norway
Hanne Hollnagel, Central Research Unit of General Practice, Panum Institute, Univ. of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark)

Chapter XVI - Family Medicine should Shift Attention from Rationality to Emotions: Negative Position; pp. 173-179
(Joaquim Couto, Porto, Portugal)

Chapter XVII - Family Medicine should Encourage the Development of
Luxury Practices: Affirmative Position; pp. 181-186
(Stephen Bohan, Dept. of Emergency Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, United States)

Chapter XVIII - Family Medicine should Encourage the Development of
Luxury Practices: Negative Position; pp. 187-201
(Martin Donohoe, Dept. of Community Health, Portland State Univ., Oregon, United States)

Chapter XIX - Family Medicine should Promote the Delivery of Care
through Group Practices: Affirmative Position; pp. 203-212
(Pieter van den Hombergh, Centre of Quality of Care Research, Univ. of Nijmegen, and National Association of General Practitioners (LHV), The Netherlands, Stephen Campbell, National Primary Care Research and Development Centre, Manchester, England)

Chapter XX - Family Medicine should Promote the Delivery of Care
through Group Practices: Negative Position; pp. 213-219
(Douglas Iliff, Topeka, Kansas, United States)

Chapter XXI - Family Medicine should Emphasize the Provision of Care
as a Social Good: Affirmative Position; pp. 221-228
(John Geyman, Dept. of Family Medicine, Univ. of Washington, Seattle, United States)

Chapter XXII - Family Medicine should emphasize the Provision of Care
as a Social Good: Negative Position; pp. 229-236
(Joseph Heath, Dept. of Philosophy, Univ. of Toronto, Toronto, Canada)

Chapter XXIII - Family Medicine should Support the Optional Autonomy of Patients in Decision-making: Affirmative Position; pp. 237-250
(Myfanwy Davies, Glyn Elwyn, Centre for Health Sciences Research, Cardiff Univ., Wales)

Chapter XXIV - Family Medicine should Support the Optional Autonomy of Patients in Decision-making: Negative Position; pp. 251-259
(Robert McNutt, Dept. of Medicine, Rush Univ. Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois, United States)

Chapter XXV - Family Medicine should Self-regulate to Best Protect Patient and Professional Autonomy: Affirmative Position; pp. 261-267
(Kieran Walsh, London, England)

Chapter XXVI - Family Medicine should Self-regulate to Best Protect Patient and Professional Autonomy: Negative Position; pp. 269-278
(Ellie Scrivens, Centre for Health Planning and Management, Keele Univ., Keele, England, Sue Trail, Kirklees Primary Care Trust, West Yorkshire, England)

Epilogue: Trends and Battles Over the Next 10 Years

Index

   Binding: Hardcover
   Pub. Date: 2007
   ISBN: 1-60021-616-1
   Status: AV
  
Status Code Description
AN Announcing
FM Formatting
PP Page Proofs
FP Final Production
EP Editorial Production
PR At Prepress
AP At Press
AV Available
  
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Ideological Debates in Family Medicine