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Pharyngeal Dysphagia Secondary to Brain Injury (Stroke and Traumatic): Analysis of Tracheal Aspiration $100.00
Authors:  Rosa Terre
Abstract:
Aims
To ascertain the videofluoroscopic (VFS) pharyngeal alterations in patients with tracheal aspiration, secondary to brain injury (stroke and traumatic brain injury -TBI-) and its evolution.
Methods
Forty six patients (twenty patients with stroke and twenty-six patients with severe TBI) with videofluoroscopic diagnosis of tracheal aspiration were prospectively evaluated. Videofluoroscopic examination were performed at admission and repeated at 1, 3, 6 and 12 months of follow-up.
Results
In stroke patients at admission, we found 70% of patients with mean pharyngeal transit time (PTT) increased and pharyngeal delayed time (PDT) also in 70% of patients. In TBI we found PDT in 27% and increased PTT in 42% of patients. During follow-up, an improvement was observed in pharyngeal function, with the number of patients with aspiration decreasing, at one year aspiration persisted in 23% of stroke patients (evolution was related to the affected vascular territory: 12% of anterior territory lesions, vs 58% of posterior territory lesions), and 23% in TBI patients. At one year the mean duration of PDT and PTT in stroke patients, albeit reduced, persisted abnormally longer,however in TBI patients the mean duration of these temporal measurements was normal (but 7 patients had a longer temporal measurement)
Conclusion
Swallowing physiology in stroke and in severe TBI greatly improved during follow-up and the number of aspirations decreased progressively. 


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Pharyngeal Dysphagia Secondary to Brain Injury (Stroke and Traumatic): Analysis of Tracheal Aspiration