Nova Publishers
My Account Nova Publishers Shopping Cart
HomeBooksSeriesJournalsReference CollectionseBooksInformationSalesImprintsFor Authors
            
  Top » Catalog » Books » Environment » Global Warming in the 21st Century Chapters » My Account  |  Cart Contents  |  Checkout   
Quick Find
  
Use keywords to find the product you are looking for.
Advanced Search
What's New? more
Theory of Literature
$243.00
Shopping Cart more
0 items
Information
Shipping & Returns
Privacy Notice
Conditions of Use
Contact Us
Notifications more
NotificationsNotify me of updates to Long-Term Experimental Warming Affects Tissue C/N Ratios Differently in Three Strongly Chionophilous Alpine Species
Tell A Friend
 
Tell someone you know about this product.
Long-Term Experimental Warming Affects Tissue C/N Ratios Differently in Three Strongly Chionophilous Alpine Species $0.00
Authors:  Sylvi M. Sandvik, Wenche Eide, University of Agder, Faculty of Engineering and Science, Kristiansand, Norway, and others
Abstract:
Late-melting snowbed communities are occupied by plant specialists exposed to extremely short growing seasons and cold and nutrient-poor soil. The aim of this study is to investigate how plant tissue chemistry in three co-occurring strongly chionophilous snowbed species responds to 10 years of experimental warming using open top chambers (OTCs) to increase temperature by about 1.6C in the air and 2.6C in the soil. We harvested shoots from two forbs and leaves from a sedge species in OTCs and control plots, at 1400 meters elevation in the alpine Norway. The plant material was dried and chemical analyses were undertaken. Warming (main effect) increased the carbon concentration and decreased the nitrogen concentration significantly in all three species Cerastium cerastoides (L.) and Epilobium anagallidifolium (Lam.) (both forbs) and Carex lachenalii (Schkuhr) (sedge). Warming affected, however, the ratio between carbon and nitrogen concentration (C/N) differently depending on the species. C/N ratios in both forbs increased while no changes in C/N ratio appeared in the sedge. Differences in C/N ratio responses indicate different adaptability to warming effects and different phenotypic plasticity between the species that may represent a threat to biodiversity in these habitats. Different adaptability of plant species to temperature increases may also threaten the future existence of snowbeds as distinctive alpine habitats. 


Available Options:
Version:

  Open Access item.
  Click below PDF icon for free download.

  

This is an Open Access item. Click above PDF icon for free download.
Special Focus Titles
01.Violent Communication and Bullying in Early Childhood Education
02.Cultural Considerations in Intervention with Women and Children Exposed to Intimate Partner Violence
03.Chronic Disease and Disability: The Pediatric Lung
04.Fruit and Vegetable Consumption and Health: New Research
05.Fire and the Sword: Understanding the Impact and Challenge of Organized Islamism. Volume 2

Nova Science Publishers
© Copyright 2004 - 2021

Long-Term Experimental Warming Affects Tissue C/N Ratios Differently in Three Strongly Chionophilous Alpine Species