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01.Climate Adversity: Yet Another Stressor for Rural Adolescents (pp. 513-519)
02.Climate Change and Child Health in Australia: Likely Futures, New Inequities? (pp. 493-500)
03.Flooding and Infectious Disease in Rural Children: Can Intervention Mitigate Predicted Increases in Disease Burden? (pp. 393-404)
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Flooding and Infectious Disease in Rural Children: Can Intervention Mitigate Predicted Increases in Disease Burden? (pp. 393-404) $45.00
Authors:  Colleen Lau and Philip Weinstein
Abstract:
Flooding has the potential to trigger disease outbreaks from
the sudden and severe disruption to both natural and built
environments. As a result of global climate change, extreme
weather events such as flooding are predicted to occur with
increasing frequency and intensity. Populations at
particularly high risk include those who live in areas prone
to natural disasters, vulnerable groups such as children, and
communities with poor resources to cope with additional
stresses. In this paper we examine the mechanisms by
which flooding can increase the risk of a wide range of
infectious diseases, with particular focus on the high
vulnerability of children who live in rural areas. The
potential long-term significance of these infections, the
importance of ongoing disease surveillance post-disaster,
and the current gaps in knowledge regarding the long-term
health impacts of natural disasters are also discussed. It is
essential to improve public health infrastructure, enhance
surveillance systems, encourage research on the immediate
and long-term health impact of natural disasters, improve
our understanding of the environmental drivers of disease
emergence, and build capacity to cope with the increasing
threats of infectious disease as a result of environmental
and climate change. 


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Flooding and Infectious Disease in Rural Children: Can Intervention Mitigate Predicted Increases in Disease Burden? (pp. 393-404)