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Primary Production and Carbon Cycling in the Deep Sea : Archaeal Carbon Fixation and Methane Oxidation pp. 199-219 $100.00
Authors:  (Nianzhi Jiao, Chuanlun Zhang, National Key Laboratory for Marine Environmental Sciences, University of Xiamen, Xiamen, Fujian, China, and others)
Abstract:
The discovery of nonthermophilic archaea (crenarchaeota and euryarchaeota) in the open ocean and coastal water using culture-independent molecular technologies was reported in two seminal papers in the early 1990s (DeLong, 1992; Fuhrman et al., 1992), and this corrected our previous biased view that crenarcheota only existed in extreme environments such as hydrothermal vents or terrestrial thermal springs. Since then, research on nonthermophilic archaea has been intensely pursued intensely and it is now clear that these organisms occur widely in low temperature marine and terrestrial environments (see reviews by DeLong, 1998; Schleper et al., 2005). Overall, in marine water columns, nonthermophilic archaea are dominated by Group I crenarchaeota and Group II euryarchaeota. In marine sediments, not only Group I crenarchaeota and Group II euryarchaeota are present but also a variety of other archaeal species, including the Marine Benthic Group crenarchaeota, Miscellaneous Crenarchaeotal Group, and an unidentified euryarchaeota group (Vetriani et al., 1999; Inagaki et al., 2006; Biddle et al., 2006). In addition, anaerobic methane-oxidizing archaea (ANME groups) widely occur in association with gas hydrates, cold seeps, and organic rich thermal sediments (e.g., Boetius et al., 2000; Orphan et al., 2001; Mills et al., 2003; Knittel et al., 2005) as well as in anoxic water bodies like the Black Sea and Cariaco Basin (Madrid et al., 2001; Durisch-Kaiser et al., 2005; Schubert et al., 2006). This section reviews recent observations of the occurrence and diversity, abundance, metabolic pathways, and contributions to carbon and nitrogen cycles of nonthermophilic archaea in the deep oceans and marine sediments. 


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Primary Production and Carbon Cycling in the Deep Sea : Archaeal Carbon Fixation and Methane Oxidation pp. 199-219