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First trimester serum adiponectin levels in women later developing mild pre-eclampsia and their comparison with other hormones (pp. 133-144) $100.00
Authors:  (Nick A. Bersinger)
Abstract:
Adiponectin is an adipose tissue derived protein which, in spite of its high circulating concentrations, has not been extensively studied. Its serum concentrations were reported negatively to correlate to body mass and, in parallel, to the circulating leptin levels. It was also found to inversely correlate with insulin resistance and, in pregnancy when compared to healthy pregnant women, to be decreased in the presence of gestational diabetes. In pre-eclampsia (PE) after its onset, circulating adiponectin was reported to increase in the majority but not in all studies. When measured in the first trimester, adiponectin levels were found to be decreased in women later developing pre-eclampsia in one study, while another reported increased concentrations in early-onset and unchanged levels in late-onset pre-eclampsia.
A retrospective analysis was performed with 50 patients who subsequently developed mild, late-onset pre-eclampsia which is the most frequent manifestation of the disease. Sera were obtained between 11+2 and 13+4 weeks of gestation, and each of them was matched with two control sera for gestational age, maternal age, maternal pre-pregnancy weight, and duration of storage. Total circulating adiponectin was determined by microplate ELISA. The serum levels of a panel of hormones and growth factors in the same samples were available either from routine screening or from previous studies performed in our laboratory. Adiponectin concentrations were cross-sectionally compared between the cases and the matched healthy controls by Mann-Whitney U test, and correlations between adiponectin and other hormones and growth factors were studied using Spearman's Rank Correlation analysis.
Concentrations of total adiponectin did not differ in our sample of first trimester sera between women developing mild, late-onset pre-eclampsia and matched controls. The medians were 10.8 (range 2.1 21.4) in the cases and 9.8 (range 2.9 22.9) μg/mL, respectively. Adiponectin levels were negatively correlated with the maternal pre-pregnancy weight and with the serum concentrations of leptin and C-reactive protein. Positive correlations were observed with the free β-subunit of hCG, PAPP-A, soluble endoglin, the soluble form of Flt-1, and inhibin A but not with activin A.
Adiponectin does not seem to be a marker for early detection of pre-eclampsia, or at least not for its mild, more frequent form. However, it is interesting to note that it is predominantly the proteins originating from the placenta that show positive correlations with adiponectin. 


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First trimester serum adiponectin levels in women later developing mild pre-eclampsia and their comparison with other hormones (pp. 133-144)