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The Relationship between Childhood Height and Adolescent Intelligence (pp. 55-70) $100.00
Authors:  (Uyen N Tran, Michael J O’Callaghan, Abdullah A Mamun, Jake M Najman, Gail M Williams & William Bor)
Abstract:
Longitudinal studies from the 1940's and 1950's have found height and intelligence to be related. However, this relationship has not been well studied in recent population cohorts given the secular increases in height and intelligence worldwide. We aimed to examine this relationship between childhood height and intelligence at 14 years of age in a recent longitudinal cohort. A series of multiple linear and logistic regression models was used to determine the relationship between height categories at 14 years old and 5 to 14 years of age, and mean Ravens score and Ravens score less than 85, taking into account potential confounding or modifying factors. A total of 2934 children who were participants in the Mater-University study of pregnancy, Brisbane, and who were examined at ages 5 and 14 years. Outcome Measures were mean Ravens scores and Ravens scores less than 85 at 5 and 14 years old. Short stature at 14 years of age was significantly associated with Ravens score less than 85 after adjusting for potential confounding factors, though it was not associated with difference in mean Ravens score. In the longitudinal analysis, adolescents who were short at 5 years old irrespective of height at 14 years of age had increased odds of Ravens score less than 85. The most significant findings were that short stature at 5 and 14 years of age was significantly associated with Ravens scores less than 85, and catch up growth did not alter this association. 


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The Relationship between Childhood Height and Adolescent Intelligence (pp. 55-70)