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Alternative Halomethylation Processes and the Corresponding Preparation Routes for Anion Exchange Membranes by Avoiding the Use of Hazardous Materials Chloromethyl Methyl Ether (CME) and Bis-Chloromethylether (BCME) (pp. 55-88) $25.00
Authors:  Tongwen Xu (University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, P.R. China)
Abstract:
Ion exchange membranes have been widely used in various industrial fields, such as electrodialysis to concentrate or deionize aqueous electrolyte solutions, diffusion dialysis to recover acid or alkali from waste acid or alkali solutions, anion exchange layer constructed into a bipolar membrane for cleaning productions and separations, polymer electrolyte for fuel cell, etc. To satisfy with these requirements, strong acid type cation exchange membranes with sulfuric group and strong base type anion exchange membrane with quaternary ammonium group were commonly prepared from styrene-divinylbenzene copolymers. In such a route, preparation of a cation exchange membrane seems to be easier by simple sulphonation with concentrated sulfuric acid or chloride sulphonic acid; while preparation of an anion exchange membrane had to experience more complicated procedures: chloromethylation and quaternary amination. Particularly, in the chloromethylation, the used chloromethyl methyl ether or bis-chloromethylether is a potent carcinogen and its use has been restricted since the 1970s. Till now, some efforts have been made to cancel the use of such hazardous material. Therefore, in this chapter, these routes for anion exchange membrane preparations in the absence of chloromethyl methyl ether or bis-chloromethylether will be reviewed and commented. 


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Alternative Halomethylation Processes and the Corresponding Preparation Routes for Anion Exchange Membranes by Avoiding the Use of Hazardous Materials Chloromethyl Methyl Ether (CME) and Bis-Chloromethylether (BCME) (pp. 55-88)