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Self-reported executive functioning and satisfaction for quality of life dimensions in adults with multiple sclerosis (pp. 167-174) $45.00
Authors:  Teresa Maria Sgaramella, Loredana Carrieri, Gianola Stenta, Franca Bortolon, Francesco Perini, and Salvatore Soresi
Abstract:
According to literature, quality of life in MS is frequently compromised, with a significant role played by cognitive functioning, in particular by executive components. Given the relevance of these processes in dealing with personal and work life demands, the role of executive functioning was investigated. Psychological models of quality of life (QoL) were taken into account, which suggest the role of satisfaction for quality of life experienced. The research question is then on the role of self-reported executive functioning on satisfaction for quality of life in adults with multiple sclerosis (MS), who experience a condition of chronic, unpredictable neurological disability. Thirty-nine adults with a relapsing remitting or secondary progressive MS were involved. Their cognitive involvement was mild to moderate; mean disability severity measured with EDSS was 3.55 (SD = 2.26). Two self-report questionnaires were used in order to analyze executive functioning and satisfaction for dimensions of quality of life. More difficulties in executive functioning were reported both in general and specific cognitive and non-cognitive components. Comparing participants according to the efficiency of executive functioning, several ANOVAs evidenced that subjects reporting higher executive functioning were also characterized by higher satisfaction for quality of life experienced in well-being, social support, self-determination, economic status and professional activities. These results underline the relevance of evaluating executive components, also with self-report measures, and the usefulness of psychological models of QoL in addressing individuals’ needs. Several implications can be drawn for rehabilitation counselors. 


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Self-reported executive functioning and satisfaction for quality of life dimensions in adults with multiple sclerosis (pp. 167-174)