Nova Publishers
My Account Nova Publishers Shopping Cart
HomeBooksSeriesJournalsReference CollectionseBooksInformationSalesImprintsFor Authors
            
  Top » Catalog » Journals » International Journal of Child and Adolescent Health » Volume 8 Issue 3 Articles » My Account  |  Cart Contents  |  Checkout   
Quick Find
  
Use keywords to find the product you are looking for.
Advanced Search
What's New? more
Fetal Alcohol Syndrome: Recognition, Differential Diagnosis and Long-Term Effects
$73.80
Shopping Cart more
0 items
Information
Shipping & Returns
Privacy Notice
Conditions of Use
Contact Us
Bestsellers
01.Munchausen syndrome by proxy: A form of child abuse (pp. 259-263)
Notifications more
NotificationsNotify me of updates to Glucocorticoid-responsive hypertension in early childhood followed up for five years: A case of 11-beta-hydroxylase deficiency (pp. 359-363)
Tell A Friend
 
Tell someone you know about this product.
Glucocorticoid-responsive hypertension in early childhood followed up for five years: A case of 11-beta-hydroxylase deficiency (pp. 359-363) $45.00
Authors:  Alphonsus N Onyiriuka and Nosakhare J Iduoriyekemwen
Abstract:
Background: 11-beta-hydroxlase deficient congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is a rare cause of hypertension in infancy. Such hypertension is usually noted in later childhood and adolescence. Objective: To describe a case of an 18-month old girl with glucocorticoid-responsive hypertension followed up for five years. Methods: In this paper we described the case of a seven-year old Nigerian girl whose hypertension secondary to 11-beta-hydroxylase-deficient congenital adrenal hyperplasia was diagnosed at the age of 18 months and followed up for five years. Results: The hypertension responded to glucocorticoid therapy, reoccurred on default and resolved on re-starting glucocorticoid. The blood pressure has remained normal over a period of five-and-half years on maintenance prednisolone. Anthropometry at the age of seven years showed weight 24kg (75th percentile), height (50th percentile), body mass index (50 -75th percentile). Sexual maturity rating showed breast Tanner stage 3 and pubic hair stage 2. No further increase in size of the stump of the clitoris. Some of the management challenges encountered in the care of this patient included lack of laboratory facilities for diagnosis and monitoring of therapy, brief period of default, and irregular supply of oral hydrocortisone. Conclusion: Although 11-beta-hydroxylase deficient CAH is a rare cause of hypertension in early childhood, it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of hypertension with virilisation in any prepubercent female. 


Available Options:
Version:
Special Focus Titles
01.Violent Communication and Bullying in Early Childhood Education
02.Cultural Considerations in Intervention with Women and Children Exposed to Intimate Partner Violence
03.Chronic Disease and Disability: The Pediatric Lung
04.Fruit and Vegetable Consumption and Health: New Research
05.Fire and the Sword: Understanding the Impact and Challenge of Organized Islamism. Volume 2

Nova Science Publishers
© Copyright 2004 - 2020

Glucocorticoid-responsive hypertension in early childhood followed up for five years: A case of 11-beta-hydroxylase deficiency (pp. 359-363)