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Blood Glucose Variability in Diabetes with Reference to Circadian Dysfunction and Target Organ Damage (pp. 77-80) $0.00
Authors:  Saibal Chakravorty and Aditya Chakravorty
Abstract:
It is now known from various researches that living organisms have a biological clock in every cell, which governs physiological functioning of the body. The majority of metabolic activity, endocrine and exocrine secretions are all guided by definite rhythmicity matching with the tissue clocks. Evidence from various studies indicated that disturbance in glucose homeostasis follows disruption of these molecular clocks. The vital functions of the human body are synchronized with a definite circadian rhythm and any disruption to this circadian system leads to disruption in glucose metabolism, especially in patients with Type 2 Diabetes. This review aims to emphasize circadian dysfunction as a mechanism of blood glucose variations and risk of target organ damage.
The global diabetes prevalence is estimated to be 9.3%, expected to rise to 10.2% by 2030 and 10.9% by 2045. The prevalence is higher in urban than in rural areas and is higher in high-income countries than in low-income countries [1]. Epidemiological studies have demonstrated an associations between circadian disruption and increased risk of Type 2 diabetes, specially seen in shift workers. Improper eating patterns, shorter sleep duration and reduced daylight exposure are the common lifestyle changes leading to disruption of natural circadian system. Evidence is accumulating regarding the association of late meal timing, loss of sleep, social jetlag, and late chronotype with an increased risk of Type 2 diabetes [2]. 


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Blood Glucose Variability in Diabetes with Reference to Circadian Dysfunction and Target Organ Damage (pp. 77-80)