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Can Potassium and Magnesium Deficiency Predispose to Variations in Blood Pressures and Aggravate Hypertension? (pp. 115-120) $0.00
Authors:  Ram B. Singh, Jan Fedacko, Narsingh Verma, Anuj Maheshwari, Shashank Joshi, Kshitij Bharadwaj, O. A. Bowered, Sergey Chibisov, and Elena Kharlitskaya
Abstract:
Despite advances in the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs), stroke, hyper-tension and heart attack over two past decades, hypertension remains an important public health problem in the world. Diuretics have been used for management as first line therapy for decreasing blood pressure. However, higher doses of diuretics if administered for a long period may be associated with adverse effects [1, 2]. Diuretic drugs increase urine output due to promotion of diuresis by the kidney, which is accomplished by sodium handling by the kidney [2]. If the kidney excretes more sodium, then water excretion will also increase. Most diuretics produce diuresis by inhibiting the reabsorption of sodium at different segments of the renal tubular system. In certain conditions, a combination of two drugs or two diuretics is administered because this can be significantly more effective due to synergistic effects than either compound alone [2]. It is possible that one nephron segment can compensate for altered sodium reabsorption at another nephron segment; therefore, blocking multiple nephron sites may enhance efficacy of the antihypertensive agent. Since thiazide diuretics increase sodium delivery to the distal segment of the distal tubule, it may be associated with increases in to loss of potassium and magnesium leading to hypokalemia and hypo-magnesemia [1, 2]. It is known that potassium and calcium are important in smooth muscle contraction, which is responsible for blood pressure regulation [3]. In presence of simultaneous magnesium deficiency, potassium deficiency may become resistant to treat and may have adverse electrolyte homeostasis in the various organs of the body leading to circadian dysfunctions. This view point aims to highlight the role of potassium and magnesium in the regulation of blood pressure and to emphasize that deficiency of potassium may aggravate hypertension along with increased blood pressure variability. 


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Can Potassium and Magnesium Deficiency Predispose to Variations in Blood Pressures and Aggravate Hypertension? (pp. 115-120)