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Foreign Presence in U.S. Science and Technology
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Editors: David R. Ogelthorpe
Book Description:
The increased presence of foreign students in graduate science and engineering programs and in the scientific workforce has been and continues to be of concern to some in the scientific community. Enrollment of U.S. citizens in graduate science and engineering programs has not kept pace with that of foreign students in those programs. In addition to the number of foreign students in graduate science and engineering programs, a significant number of university faculty in the scientific disciplines are foreign, and foreign doctorates are employed in large numbers by industry.

Few will dispute that U.S. universities and industry have chosen foreign talent to fill many positions. Foreign scientists and engineers serve the needs of industry at the doctorate level and also have been found to serve in major roles at the masters level. However, there are charges that U.S. workers are adversely affected by the entry of foreign scientists and engineers, who reportedly accept lower wages than U.S. citizens would accept in order to enter or remain in the United States. NSF data reveal that in 2005, the foreign student population earned approximately 34.7% of the doctorate degrees in the sciences and approximately 63.1% of the doctorate degrees in engineering. In 2005, foreign students on temporary resident visas earned 30.8% of the doctorates in the sciences, and 58.6% of the doctorates in engineering. The participation rates in 2004 were 28.5% and 57.3%, respectively. In 2005, permanent resident status students earned 3.8% of the doctorates in the sciences and 4.5% of the doctorates in engineering, slightly above the 2004 levels of 3.7% and 4.2%, respectively.

Many in the scientific community maintain that in order to compete with countries that are rapidly expanding their scientific and technological capabilities, the country needs to bring to the United States those whose skills will benefit society and will enable us to compete in the new-technology based global economy. The academic community is concerned that the more stringent visa requirements for foreign students may have a continued impact on enrollments in colleges and universities. There are those who believe that the underlying problem of foreign students in graduate science and engineering programs is not necessarily that there are too many foreign-born students, but that there are not enough native-born students pursuing scientific and technical disciplines.

Table of Contents:
Preface

1. Foreign Students in the United States: Policies and Legislation
(Chad C. Haddal) (pp. 1-32)

2. Foreign Science and Engineering Presence in U.S. Institutions and the Labor Force
(Christine M. Matthews) (pp. 33-56)

3. Monitoring Foreign Students in the United States: The Student and Exchange Visitor Information System (SEVIS)
(Alison Siskin) (pp. 57-67)

4. United States' and Other Countries' Strategies for Attracting and Funding International Students
(George A. Scott, GAO) (pp. 69-82)

5. Challenges in Attracting International Students to the United States and Implications for Global Competitiveness
(George A. Scott, GAO) (pp. 83-97)

Index

   Binding: Hardcover
   Pub. Date: 2009 3rd Quarter
   Pages: 108 pp.
   ISBN: 978-1-60692-442-6
   Status: AV
  
Status Code Description
AN Announcing
FM Formatting
PP Page Proofs
FP Final Production
EP Editorial Production
PR At Prepress
AP At Press
AV Available
  
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